During the Why Christian? Conference in Minneapolis, MN many people were asked to record a short “audio selfie” that answers the following question: When you think of a moment of doubt or struggle, what person or experience has prompted you to ask deeper questions about your faith? How do these questions sustain you in your journey?
As you follow the walking path, you begin to make it out. . . a woman crying for help. A few more yards and you see her around the bend; an obviously pregnant woman on the ground in horrifying pain. What do you do?
It is an interesting thing reflecting on the nature of care I saw in Guyana. I found myself struggling to keep up with state of the art techniques while practicing in a setting having to comply with the status quo. My favorite mental exercise while practicing down in this resource poor environment was “what drug can I give this patient today”. So much of the time in the states the answer is fairly easy and has a protocol behind it. Often the hospital in Georgetown would run out a typically used drug, which forced me to stop and think. I feel this made me a better physician.
Dan and I will be blessed with plenty of gifts, plenty of diapers and onesies and gear (...my goodness, all the gear!)... So if you want to offer a special congratulations on our big news, jump over to my fundraising page to leave a message and a gift in support of Hope Through Healing Hands.
I was lucky to have travelled to Kijabe at an exciting time; there has been an increase in awareness in the medical community about the lack of access to safe anesthesia in low-middle income countries. The GE corporation has been prescient and magnanimous in their support of the efforts by anesthesiologists at Vanderbilt to create a sustainable program to educate Kenyan nurse anesthetists on how to provide a safe anesthetic.
Data is important. Because of data collection and monitoring, UNICEF can report that, “On average, one out of every 11 children born in sub-Saharan Africa dies before the age of 5.” In this example, data demonstrates the magnitude of the problem and serves as a catalyst for people to come together to develop strategies and implement programs to improve child health. Then, with continued data collection and monitoring, progress towards reducing child mortality can be measured.
Humanitarian photographer Esther Havens tells the incredible story of photographing the mother and baby in Rwanda, that later became the cover photo for The Mother & Child Project. Six years later, Havens returned to Rwanda to see what had become of the mother and baby that had meant so much to her for all these years.
Once a week I spend the day following LCA’s community health workers (CHW) from home to home to visit families in the Thrive Thru 5 program. This is probably one of my favorite days of the week.

Jun 09 2015 - Jun 10 2015

FGHL Jennifer Quigley: Last Days in Haiti

Our last clinic and teaching are back in Limbe! Clinic St. Jean is a large hospital that sees about 250-300 patients a day. The directors wanted the majority of their staff to receive the education, so we did training over two days and taught over 50 providers and nursing students.